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educational media on the critical issues of our times

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

Starting at $89

A Film by Monique W. Morris and Jacoba Atlas

79 minutes

Scene Selection • Closed Captioned

Grades 7 - Adult
Item #:PSH-1165

Select DVD License (limited PPR included)

DVD
K-12 Schools, Public Libraries, Community Groups - $89
Colleges, Businesses, Other Institutions - $295
Colleges (DVD with Digital Site License) - $395
Inspired by the groundbreaking book of the same name by Monique W. Morris, Ed.D, Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools, takes a deep dive into the lives of Black girls and the practices, cultural beliefs and policies that disrupts one of the most important factors in their lives – education. Alarmingly, African American girls are the fastest-growing population in the juvenile justice system and the only group of girls to disproportionately experience criminalization at every education level.

The film underscores the challenges Black girls face with insights from multiple experts across the country who have worked extensively in the fields of social and criminal justice, gender equality and educational equity, giving context to the crisis and providing a roadmap for how our educational system and those who interact with Black girls can provide a positive rather than punitive response to behaviors that are often misunderstood or misrepresented.

While the challenges facing Black boys in the U.S. have garnered national attention, absent from that conversation is how girls of color, particularly Black girls, are being impacted. Pushout addresses that crisis by focusing on the challenges Black girls face and emphasizing first-person narratives from them. Hearing from girls as young as seven and as old as 19, they describe navigating a society that often marginalizes and dismisses them. At the same time the documentary lays out how adults and policy makers can address the needs of these young girls and women with positive responses that can short circuit the pervasive over punishment of Black girls.


FILMMAKER'S STATEMENT: "I want people to walk away from this documentary understanding, number one, that our girls are not disposable...and to really think about how we can shift our understanding of what constitutes a bad attitude or sassiness or combativeness.

The documentary is a tool to explore how educators, parents, and policy makers can demonstrate that we love our girls and hold them, and their educational opportunities, as sacred to our community."
-Monique W. Morris, Ed.D
Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

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