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The Good Fight: The Martin Litton Story
The Good Fight: The Martin Litton Story
The Good Fight: The Martin Litton Story
Item#: GOO-1010
License:  Format: 

Running Time: 60 minutes
Grade 9 – Adult
Closed Captioned • Scene Selection
A film by Mark Fraser, James Fox and Boris Zubov

 

Broadcast on PBS 'Natural Heroes' series

 

Winner, Best River & Water Conservation Film, Mountain Film in Telluride

Official Selection, Wild & Scenic Film Festival

Official Selection, Aotearoa Environmental Film Festival. New Zealand

 

 

All prices include DVD and PPR

Public Libraries-Circulation Only: $39.95
K-12 Schools & Public Libraries w/PPR: $89
Colleges, Universities, & Gov't: $195
Colleges, Universities, & Gov't (with DSL): $495



The Good Fight chronicles the extraordinary efforts of one of the leading conservationists of modern times, who continued his activism into his 90’s.

Martin Litton, known as the "Grand Old Man of the Canyon," is revered as the man who saved the Grand Canyon by preventing dams from being built on the Colorado River that would have flooded the Grand Canyon.

In his 90's, his passion was saving the last of the giant sequoias.

Litton was a close friend and cohort of famed environmentalists David Brower and Edward Abbey, as well as other major figures in the conservation movement. Brower first recruited Litton in 1952 for a successful campaign to oppose the construction of dams in Dinosaur National Monument.

This campaign started a long association with the Sierra Club and lifelong opposition to dam-building on the Colorado, including the fight to stop the dams proposed for Grand Canyon National Park. Litton, honored with the Sierra Club’s John Muir Award, was also instrumental in establishing Redwood National Park.

An avid river runner all his life, Martin Litton was never daunted by the ferocious whitewater of the Grand Canyon nor fighting government bureaucracy on behalf of the environment: “People always tell me not to be extreme. ‘Be reasonable!’ they say. But I never felt it did any good to be reasonable about anything in conservation, because what you give away will never come back—ever.”